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Non Food Products

Fryers, Deep Fat

Deep frying is a cooking method in which food is submerged in hot oil or fat. This is normally performed with a deep fryer or chip pan; industrially, a pressure fryer or vacuum fryer may be used. Deep frying is classified as a dry cooking method because no water is used. Due to the high temperature involved and the high heat conduction of oil, it cooks food extremely quickly.

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Fryers, Convection

A convection fryer cooks foods while keeping them moist on the inside, crisp and browned on the outside without using fats or oils. Convection fryers may be used to barbeque, roast, air frie, broil, bake, steam, dehydrate, and grill.

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Freezers, Portable

Freezer units are used in households and in industry and commerce. Most freezers operate around 0 °F (−18 °C).1 Portable - Easily carried.

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Freezers

Freezer units are used in households and in industry and commerce. Most freezers operate around 0 °F (−18 °C). Domestic freezers can be included as a separate compartment in a refrigerator, or can be a separate appliance. Domestic freezers are generally upright units resembling refrigerators, or chests (resembling upright units laid on their backs). Many upright modern freezers come with an ice dispenser built into their door

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Fountains, Ornamental & Display

A fountain is a piece of architecture which pours water into a basin or jets it into the air either to supply drinking water or for decorative or dramatic effect. Fountains were originally purely functional, connected to springs or aqueducts and used to provide drinking water and water for bathing and washing to the residents of cities, towns and villages. Until the late 19th century most fountains operated by gravity, and needed a source of water higher than the fountain, such as a reservoir or aqueduct, to make the water flow or jet into the air. In addition to providing drinking water, fountains were used for decoration and to celebrate their builders. By the end of the 19th century, as indoor plumbing became the main source of drinking water, urban fountains became purely decorative. Fountains are used today to decorate city parks and squares; to honor individuals or events; for recreation and for entertainment. A Splash pad or spray pool allows city residents to enter, get wet and cool off in summer. The musical fountain combines moving jets of water, colored lights and recorded music, controlled by a computer, for dramatic effects. Drinking fountains provide clean drinking water in public buildings, parks and public spaces.

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Fountains, Beverage

A soda fountain is a device that dispenses carbonated drinks. They can be found in restaurants, concession stands, and other locations such as convenience stores. The device combines syrup (commonly dispensed from a Bag-In-Box), carbon dioxide, and water to make soft drinks.1 A water fountain or drinking fountain is designed to provide drinking water and has a basin arrangement with either continuously running water or a tap. The drinker bends down to the stream of water and swallows water directly from the stream. Modern indoor drinking fountains may incorporate filters to remove impurities from the water and chillers to reduce its temperature. In some regional dialects, water fountains are called bubblers.

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Food Waste Disposers

A garbage disposal unit or waste disposal unit is a device, usually electrically powered, installed under a kitchen sink between the sink's drain and the trap which shreds food waste into pieces small enough—generally less than 2 mm (0.079 in)—to pass through plumbing.

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Food Processors

A food processor is a kitchen appliance used to facilitate various repetitive tasks in the process of preparation of food. Today, the term almost always refers to an electric-motor-driven appliance, although there are some manual devices also referred to as "food processors." Food processors are similar to blenders in many ways. The primary difference is that food processors use interchangeable blades and disks (attachments) instead of a fixed blade. Also, their bowls are wider and shorter, a more appropriate shape for the solid or semi-solid foods usually worked in a food processor. Usually little or no liquid is required in the operation of the food processor unlike a blender, which requires some amount of liquid to move the particles around its blade. Food processors normally have multiple functions, depending on the placement and type of attachment or blade. These functions normally consist of slicing/chopping, grinding, shredding or grating, pureeing, mixing, and kneading.

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Food Portioning Equipment

Food portioning equipment includes layer-slabbing, crumb spreading, and depanning equipment - stand-alone and inline systems. Products are mechanical or ultrasonic guillotines, ultrasonic slitters, reciprocating horizontal cutters, debones, and crumb spreaders, used to cut hard and soft cheeses, ice cream, ice cream cakes, etc.

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Food Delivery & Catering Equipment

Vehicles are often specialized to deliver different types of goods. On land, semi-trailers are outfitted with various trailers such as box trailers, flatbeds, car carriers, tanks and other specialized trailers, while railroad trains include similarly specialized cars. Armored cars, dump trucks and concrete mixers are examples of vehicles specialized for delivery of specific types of goods. On the sea, merchant ships come in various forms, such as cargo ships, oil tankers and fishing boats. Freight aircraft are used to deliver cargo. Often, passenger vehicles are used for delivery of goods. These include busses, vans, pick-ups, cars (e.g., for mail or pizza delivery), motorcycles and bicycles (e.g., for newspaper delivery). A significant amount of freight is carried in the cargo holds of passenger ships and aircraft. Everyday travelers, known as a casual courier, can also be used to deliver goods. Delivery to remote, primitive or inhospitable areas may be accomplished using small aircraft, snowmobiles, horse-drawn vehicles, dog sleds, pack animals, on foot, or by a variety of other transport methods.1 A mobile caterer serves food directly from a vehicle or cart that is designed for the purpose. Mobile catering is common at outdoor events (such as concerts), workplaces, and downtown business districts. Event catering range from box-lunch drop-off to full-service catering. Caterers and their staff are part of the foodservice industry. When most people refer to a "caterer", they are referring to an event caterer who serves food with waiting staff at dining tables or sets up a self-serve buffet

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Flowers, Foliage, Plants

A flower, sometimes known as a bloom or blossom, give rise to fruit and seeds. Many flowers have e A flower, sometimes known as a bloom or blossom, give rise to fruit and seeds. Many flowers have evolved to be attractive to animals, so as to cause them to be vectors for the transfer of pollen. In addition to facilitating the reproduction of flowering plants, flowers have long been admired and used by humans to beautify their environment but also as objects of romance, ritual, religion, medicine and as a source of food.volved to be attractive to animals, so as to cause them to be vectors for the transfer of pollen. In addition to facilitating the reproduction of flowering plants, flowers have long been admired and used by humans to beautify their environment but also as objects of romance, ritual, religion, medicine and as a source of food.

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Flooring, Tile-Vitrified Or Ceramic

Flooring is the general term for a permanent covering of a floor, or for the work of installing such a floor covering. Floor covering is a term to generically describe any finish material applied over a floor structure to provide a walking surface. Both terms are used interchangeably but floor covering refers more to loose-laid materials. Materials almost always classified as floor covering include carpet, area rugs, and resilient flooring such as linoleum or vinyl flooring. Materials commonly called flooring include wood flooring, ceramic tile, stone, terrazzo, and various seamless chemical floor coatings. A tile is a manufactured piece of hard-wearing material such as ceramic, stone, metal, or even glass. Tiles are generally used for covering roofs, floors, walls, showers, or other objects such as tabletops. Alternatively, tile can sometimes refer to similar units made from lightweight materials such as perlite, wood, and mineral wool, typically used for wall and ceiling applications. Less precisely, the modern term can refer to any sort of construction tile or similar object, such as rectangular counters used in playing games (see tile-based game). Tiles are often used to form wall and floor coverings, and can range from simple square tiles to complex mosaics. Tiles are most often made from porcelain, fired clay or ceramic with a hard glaze, but other materials are also commonly used, such as glass, metal, cork, and stone. Tiling stone is typically marble, onyx, granite or slate. Thinner tiles can be used on walls than on floors, which require thicker, more durable surfaces.1 Vitrified Tile is a tile is created by the Vitrification process. It is processed in ways that it has very low porosity (and water absorption) making it stain-resistant and strong. Vitrified tile is an alternative to marble and granite flooring. Vitrified Tiles have far superior properties compared to marble or natural granite. Being a manufactured product, their quality is controlled, whereas in naturally occurring marble and granite good quality is just a coincidence. Vitrified tiles possess much better mechanical strength, scratch resistance, resistance to acids, alkalis and chemicals, resistance to staining etc compared to other materials

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Floor Cleaning & Maintenance Equipment

Floor cleaning is a major occupation throughout the world. The main job of most cleaners is to clean floors. Methods of Floor Cleaning - The treatment needed for different types of floors is very different. For safety it is most important to ensure the floor is not left even slightly wet after cleaning or mopping up. Sawdust is used on some floors to absorb any liquids that fall rather than trying to prevent them being spilt. The sawdust is swept up and replaced each day. This was common in the past in pubs and is still used in some butchers and fishmongers. It used to be common to use tea leaves to collect dirt from carpets and remove odors. Nowadays it is sill quite common to use diatomaceous earth, or in fact any cat litter type material, to remove infestations from floors. There are also a wide variety of floor cleaning machines available today such as floor buffers, automatic floor scrubbers and sweepers, and carpet extractors that can deep clean almost any type of hard floor or carpeted flooring surface in much less time than it would take using a traditional cleaning method

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Flatware, Recovery Machines

Cutlery refers to any hand implement used in preparing, serving, and especially eating food in the Western world. It is more usually known as silverware or flatware in the United States, where cutlery can have the more specific meaning of knives and other cutting instruments. Since silverware suggests the presence of silver, the term tableware has come i Cutlery refers to any hand implement used in preparing, serving, and especially eating food in the Western world. It is more usually known as silverware or flatware in the United States, where cutlery can have the more specific meaning of knives and other cutting instruments. Since silverware suggests the presence of silver, the term tableware has come into use. The major items of cutlery in the Western world are the knife, fork and spoon. In recent times, utensils have been made combining the functionality of pairs of cutlery, including the spork (spoon / fork), spife (spoon / knife), and knork (knife / fork) or the sporf which is all three.1 A refrigerant recovery machine may combine a refrigerant recovery unit and vacuumnto use. The major items of cutlery in the Western world are the knife, fork and spoon. In recent times, utensils have been made combining the functionality of pairs of cutlery, including the spork (spoon / fork), spife (spoon / knife), and knork (knife / fork) or the sporf which is all three.1 A refrigerant recovery machine may combine a refrigerant recovery unit and vacuum

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Flagpoles, Flags & Accessories

A flag is a piece of fabric with a distinctive design that is usually rectangular and used as a symbol, as a signaling device, or decoration. The term flag is also used to refer to the graphic design employed by a flag, or to its depiction in another medium. The first flags were used to assist military coordination on battlefields, and flags have since evolved into a general tool for rudimentary signaling and identification, especially in environments where communication is similarly challenging (such as the maritime environment where semaphore is used). National flags are potent patriotic symbols with varied wide-ranging interpretations, often including strong military associations due to their original and ongoing military uses. Flags are also used in messaging, advertising, or for other decorative purposes.

 

First Aid Equipment & Supplies

A first aid kit is a collection of supplies and equipment for use in giving first aid, and can put together for the purpose (by an individual or organization, for instance), or purchased complete. There is a wide variation in the contents of first aid kits based on the knowledge and experience of those putting it together, the differing first aid requirements of the area where it may be used, and variations in legislation or regulation in a given area. The international standard for first aid kits is that they should be identified with the ISO graphical symbol for first aid (from ISO 7010) which is an equal white cross on a green background, although many kits do not comply with this standard, either because they are put together by an individual or they predate the standards. Airway, Breathing and Circulation: Most modern commercial first aid kits will contain a suitable infection barrier for performing artificial respiration as part of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, examples include: Pocket mask, Face shield. Advanced first aid kits may also contain items such as: Oropharyngeal airway, Nasopharyngeal airway, Bag valve mask, Manual aspirator or suction unit, Sphygmomanometer (blood pressure cuff), Stethoscope. Trauma injuries: Trauma injuries, such as bleeding, bone fractures or burns, are usually the main focus of most first aid kits, with items such as bandages and dressings being found in the vast majority of all kits: Adhesive bandages (band-aids, sticking plasters) - can include ones shaped for particular body parts, such as knuckles; Moleskin— for blister treatment and prevention; Dressings (sterile, applied directly to the wound) - Sterile eye pads, Sterile gauze pads, Sterile non-adherent pads, Petrolatum gauze pads, used as an occlusive ( air-tight) dressing for sucking chest wounds as well as a non-stick dressing; Bandages (for securing dressings, not necessarily sterile) - Gauze roller bandages, Elastic bandages, Adhesive elastic roller bandages (commonly called 'Vet wrap'), Triangular bandages used as slings, tourniquets, to tie splints, and many other uses; Butterfly closure strips - used like stitches to close wounds, usually only included for higher level response as can seal in infection in uncleaned wounds; Saline for cleaning wounds or washing out foreign bodies from eyes; soap - used with water to clean superficial wounds once bleeding is stopped; Antiseptic wipes or sprays for reducing the risk of infection in abrasions or around wounds; Burn dressing, which is usually a sterile pad soaked in a cooling gel; Adhesive tape, hypoallergenic; Hemostatic agents may be included in first aid kits, especially military or tactical kits, to promote clotting for severe bleeding. Personal protective equipment: The use of personal protective equipment or PPE will vary by kit, depending on its use and anticipated risk of infection. The adjuncts to artificial respiration are covered above, but other common infection control PPE includes: Gloves which are single use and disposable to prevent cross infection, Goggles or other eye protection, Surgical mask or N95 mask to reduce possibility of airborne infection transmission (sometimes placed on patient instead of caregivers, Apron. Instruments and equipment: Trauma shears for cutting clothing and general use, Scissors, Tweezers, Lighter, for sanitizing tweezers or pliers etc., alcohol pads for sanitizing equipment or unbroken skin, Irrigation syringe with catheter tip for cleaning wounds, Torch (also known as a flashlight), Instant-acting chemical cold packs, Alcohol rub (hand sanitizer) or antiseptic hand wipes, Thermometer, Space blanket (lightweight plastic foil blanket, also known as "emergency blanket"), Penlight, Cotton swab. Medication: Medication can be a controversial addition to a first aid kit, especially if it is for use on members of the public. It is, however, common for personal or family first aid kits to contain certain medications. Dependent on scope of practice, the main types of medicine are life saving medications, which may be commonly found in first aid kits used by paid or assigned first aiders for members of the public or employees, painkillers, which are often found in personal kits, but may also be found in public provision and lastly symptomatic relief medicines, which are generally only found in personal kit. Life saving - Aspirin primarily used for central medical chest pain as an anti-coagulant, Epinephrine autoinjector (brand name Epipen) often included in kits for wilderness use and in places such as summer camps to treat anaphylactic shock. Pain killers - Paracetamol (also known as Acetaminophen) is one of the most common pain killing medication, as either tablet or syrup; Anti-inflammatory painkillers such as Ibuprofen, Naproxen or other NSAIDs can be used as part of treating sprains and strains; Codeine which is both a painkiller and anti-diarrheal. Symptomatic relief - Anti diarrhea medication such as Loperamide especially important in remote or third world locations where dehydration caused by diarrhea is a leading killer of children, Oral rehydration salts, Antihistamine such as diphenhydramine, Poison treatments absorption such as activated charcoal and Emetics to induce vomiting such as syrup of ipecac although first aid manuals now advise against inducing vomiting, Smelling Salts (ammonium carbonate). Topical medications - Antiseptic ointment, fluid, moist wipe or spray, including benzalkonium chloride, Neomycin, Polymyxin B Sulfate or Bacitracin Zinc; Povidone iodine is an antiseptic in the from of liquid, swabstick, or towelette; Aloe vera gel - used for a wide variety of skin problems, including burns, sunburns, itching, and dry skin; used as a substitute for triple-antibiotic gel to keep a wound moist and prevent bandages from sticking; Burn gel - a water-based gel that acts as a cooling agent and often includes a mild anesthetic such as lidocaine and, sometimes, an antiseptic such as tea tree oil; Anti-itch ointment; Hydrocortisone cream; antihistamine cream containing diphenhydramine; Calamine lotion; Anti-fungal cream; Tincture of benzoin often in the form of an individually sealed swabstick, protects the skin and aids the adhesion of butterfly strips or adhesive bandages Read more...

 

Fire Protection Systems

Fire protection is the study and practice of mitigating the unwanted effects of fires. Buildings must be constructed in accordance with the version of the building code that is in effect when an application for a building permit is made. A firestop is a passive fire protection system of various components used to seal openings and joints in fire-resistance rated wall and/or floor assemblies, based on fire testing and certification listings. Unprotected openings in fire separations void the fire-resistance ratings of the fire separations that contain them, allowing spread of fire past the limits of the fire safety plan of the entire building. Firestops are designed to restore the fire-resistance ratings of rated wall and/or floor assemblies by impeding the spread of fire through the opening by filling the openings with fire resistant materials.
 

Fans, Electric & Ventilating

A fan is a machine used to create flow within a fluid, typically a gas such as air. A fan consists of a rotating arrangement of vanes or blades which act on the air. Usually, it is contained within some form of housing or case. This may direct the airflow or increase safety by preventing objects from contacting the fan blades. Most fans are powered by electric motors, but other sources of power may be used, including hydraulic motors and internal combustion engines. Typical applications include climate control, vehicle and machinery cooling systems, personal comfort (e.g., an electric table fan), ventilation, fume extraction, winnowing (e.g., separating chaff of cereal grains), removing dust (e.g. in a vacuum cleaner), drying (usually in combinatA fan is a machine used to create flow within a fluid, typically a gas such as air. A fan consists of a rotating arrangement of vanes or blades which act on the air. Usually, it is contained within some form of housing or case. This may direct the airflow or increase safety by preventing objects from contacting the fan blades. Most fans are powered by electric motors, but other sources of power may be used, including hydraulic motors and internal combustion engines.ion with heat) and to provide draft for a fire.

A standalone fan is typically powered with an electric motor. Fans are often attached directly to the motor's output, with no need for gears or belts. The electric motor is either hidden in the fan's center hub or extends behind it. For big industrial fans, three-phase asynchronous motors are commonly used, placed near the fan and driving it through a belt and pulleys. Smaller fans are often powered by shaded pole AC motors, or brushed or brushless DC motors. AC-powered fans usually use mains voltage, while DC-powered fans use low voltage, typically 24 V, 12 V or 5 V. Cooling fans for computer equipment exclusively use brushless DC motors, which produce much less electromagnetic interference. In machines that already have a motor, the fan is often connected to this rather than being powered independently. In firefighting, ventilation refers to the tactic of creating a draft with an opening above or opposite the entry point so that heat and smoke will be released, permitting the firefighters to find and attack the fire. Contrarily, poorly placed or timed ventilation may increase the fire's air supply, causing it to grow and spread rapidly. Mechanical fans can be used for such ventilation tactics, as can existing openings such as windows, skylights, or heat/smoke vents on the roof. High-rise buildings sometimes also incorporate fans to produce a positive pressure in stairwells and elevator shafts to reduce smoke infiltration into those spaces.
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Fabrics, Fire Resistant

A textile or cloth is a flexible material consisting of a network of natural or artificial fibres often referred to as thread or yarn. Yarn is produced by spinning raw fibres of wool, flax, cotton, or other material to produce long strands. Textiles are formed by weaving, knitting, crocheting, knotting, or pressing fibres together (felt). The words fabric and cloth are used in textile assembly trades (such as tailoring and dressmaking) as synonyms for textile. However, there are subtle differences in these terms in specialized usage. Textile refers to any material made of interlacing fibres. Fabric refers to any material made through weaving, knitting, spreading, crocheting, or bonding that may be used in production of further goods (garments, etc.). Cloth may be used synonymously with fabric but often refers to a finished piece of fabric used for a specific purpose (e.g., table cloth).1 Fireproofing, a passive fire protection measure, refers to the act of making materials or structures more resistant to fire, or to those materials themselves, or the act of applying such materials. Applying a certification listed fireproofing system to certain structures allows these to have a fire-resistance rating. The term fireproof does not necessarily mean that an item cannot ever burn: It relates to measured performance under specific conditions of testing and evaluation. Fireproofing does not allow treated items to be entirely unaffected by any fire, as conventional materials are not immune to the effects of fire at a sufficient intensity and/or duration.
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Fabrics

textile or cloth is a flexible material consisting of a network of natural or artificial fibres often referred to as thread or yarn. Yarn is produced by spinning raw fibres of wool, flax, cotton, or other material to produce long strands. Textiles are formed by weaving, knitting, crocheting, knotting, or pressing fibres together (felt). The words fabric and cloth are used in textile assembly trades (such as tailoring and dressmaking) as synonyms for textile. However, there are subtle differences in these terms in specialized usage. Textile refers to any material made of interlacing fibres. Fabric refers to any material made through weaving, knitting, spreading, crocheting, or bonding that may be used in production of further goods (garments, etc.). Cloth may be used synonymously with fabric but often refers to a finished piece of fabric used for a specific purpose (e.g., table cloth).
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Hooks, Coat, Hat & Purse

Coat and hat hooks range from peg-style coat to contemporary brass, bronze and satin nickle hooks on Oak, Cherry, and Maple or on a white lacquer rail.1 A purse hook (also known as a handbag hook or handbag hanger) is a type of hook meant to temporarily secure a purse or handbag to a table, sink, or armrest.

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Hoods

An extractor hood is a device containing a mechanical fan that hangs above the stove or cooktop in the kitchen. It is used to remove airborne grease, combustion products, smoke, odors, heat, and steam from the air by a combination of filtration and evacuation of the air.

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Heaters, Water

Water heating is a thermodynamic process using an energy source to heat water above its initial temperature. Typical domestic uses of hot water are for cooking, cleaning, bathing, and space heating. In industry, both hot water and water heated to steam have many uses. Domestically, water is traditionally heated in vessels known as water heaters, kettles, cauldrons, pots, or coppers. These metal vessels heat a batch of water but do not produce a continual supply of heated water at a preset temperature. The temperature will vary based on the consumption rate of hot water, use more and the water becomes cooler. Appliances for providing a more-or-less constant supply of hot water are variously known as water heaters, hot water heaters, hot water tanks, boilers, heat exchangers, calorifiers, or geysers depending on whether they are heating potable or non-potable water, in domestic or industrial use, their energy source, and in which part of the world they are found. In domestic installations, potable water heated for uses other than space heating is sometimes known as domestic hot water (DHW). In many countries, the most common energy sources for heating water are fossil fuels: natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, oil, or sometimes solid fuels. These fuels may be consumed directly or by the use of electricity (which may derive from any of the above fuels or from nuclear or renewable sources). Alternative energy such as solar energy, heat pumps, hot water heat recycling, and sometimes geothermal heating, may also be used as available, usually in combination with backup systems supplied by gas, oil or electricity.

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Heaters, Outdoor

Outdoor heating allows people to stay in substantially unenclosed spaces, when it would otherwise be too cold to do so. To this end, various outdoor heating appliances are available, including gas patio heaters, quartz or ceramic electric lamps, and wood burning chimenea and fire pits. In an outdoor environment, convection would quickly carry away heat in the form of hot air, so all these methods emit various amounts of their total output as radiant heat. Radiant heat is emitted from the appliance, and is absorbed by objects and people, raising their temperature.

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Heat Lamps

A heat lamp is an incandescent light bulb that is used for the principal purpose of creating heat. The spectrum of black body radiation emitted by the lamp is shifted to produce more infrared light. Many heat lamps include a red filter to minimize the amount of visible light emitted. Heat lamps often include an internal reflector. Heat lamps are commonly used in shower and bathrooms to warm bathers and in food-preparation areas of restaurants to keep food warm before serving. They are also commonly used for animal husbandry. Lights used for poultry are often called brooding lamps. The sockets used for heat lamps are usually ceramic because plastic sockets can melt or burn when exposed to the large amount of waste heat produced by the lamps, especially when operated in the "base up" position. The shroud or hood of the lamp is generally metal. There may be a wire guard over the front of the shroud, to prevent touching the hot surface of the bulb. Ordinary household white incandescent bulbs can also be used as heat lamps, but red and blue bulbs are sold for use in brood lamps and reptile lamps. 250 watt heat lamps are commonly packaged in the "R40" (5" reflector lamp) form factor with an intermediate screw base.

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Hand Trucks

A hand truck, also known as a two wheeler, stack truck, dolly, trolley, trolley truck, sack barrow, sack truck, or bag barrow, is an L-shaped box-moving handcart with handles at one end, wheels at the base, with a small ledge to set objects on, flat against the floor when the hand-truck is upright. The objects to be moved are tilted forward, the ledge is inserted underneath them, and the objects allowed to tilt back and rest on the ledge. Then the truck and object are tilted backward until the weight is balanced over the large wheels, making otherwise bulky and heavy objects easier to move. It is a first-class lever. Some hand trucks are equipped with stairclimber wheels, which, as the name implies, are designed to go up and down stairs. Stairclimber wheels can sometimes be problematic when trying to turn on flat ground as four wheels in a fixed position will be in contact with the ground. Hand trucks are fabricated from many different types of materials: tube steel, aluminum tube, aluminum extrusion, and high-impact plastics. Most commercial hand trucks that are used for beverage and food service deliveries are rugged and very light weight. They are usually designed from two extruded aluminum channel side rails and cast aluminum or magnesium parts. Some of the options that may be considered are the types of wheels, stair climber, handle type and size of wheels.

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Hand Dryers

Hand dryers are electric devices found in public washrooms that are used to dry hands. They may either operate with a button, or automatically using an infrared sensor

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Haccp Equipment

Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point or HACCP is a systematic preventive approach to food safety and pharmaceutical safety that addresses physical, chemical, and biological hazards as a means of prevention rather than finished product inspection. HACCP is used in the food industry to identify potential food safety hazards, so that key actions can be taken to reduce or eliminate the risk of the hazards being realized. The system is used at all stages of food production and preparation processes including packaging, distribution, etc. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) say that their mandatory HACCP programs for juice and meat are an effective approach to food safety and protecting public health. Meat HACCP systems are regulated by the USDA, while seafood and juice are regulated by the FDA. The use of HACCP is currently voluntary in other food industries.1 The seven HACCP principles are included in the international standard ISO 22000 FSMS 2005. This standard is a complete food safety and quality management system incorporating the elements of prerequisite programmes(GMP & SSOP), HACCP and the quality management system, which together form an organization’s Total Quality Management system.2 ISO 22000 is the new standard bound to replace HACCP on issues related to food safety. Although several companies, especially the big ones, have either implemented or are on the point of implementing ISO 22000, there are many others which are rather timid and/or reluctant to implement it. The main reason behind that is the lack of information and the fear that the new standard is too demanding in terms of bureaucratic work, from abstract of case study.

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Griddles & Grills

A griddle is a piece of cooking equipment. In the industrial world usually it is a flat plate of metal (usually aluminum, stainless steel, or cast iron). In the non-industrial world, and in traditional cultures, the griddle may be a stone or brick slab or tablet. It is used over an open flame, or on a stove, to cook many foods, including many flatbreads. The technique of griddling foods may be used to cook with dry or moist heat, and with or without oil. Griddled foods include pancakes, oatcakes, crepes, grilled cheese, unleavened breads (roti or chapati), dosa, Irish boxty and Welsh cakes.1 Grilling is a form of cooking that involves dry heat applied to the surface of food, commonly from above or below. Grilling usually involves quite a lot of direct, radiant heat, and tends to be used for cooking meat quickly and meat that has already been cut into slices (or other pieces). Food to be grilled is cooked on a grill (an open wire grid with a heat source above or below), a grill pan (similar to a frying pan, but with raised ridges to mimic the wires of an open grill), or griddle (a flat plate heated from below). Heat transfer to the food when using a grill is primarily via thermal radiation. Heat transfer when using a grill pan or griddle is by direct conduction. In the United States and Canada, when the heat source for grilling comes from above, grilling is termed broiling. In this case, the pan that holds the food is called a broiler pan, and heat transfer is by thermal convection. Direct heat grilling can expose food to temperatures often in excess of 260 °C (500°F). Grilled meat acquires a distinctive roast aroma from a chemical process called the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction only occurs when foods reach temperatures in excess of 155 °C (310 °F).

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Glass, Beveled & Tempered

Beveled glass is usually made by taking 1⁄4-inch-thick (6.4 mm) clear glass and creating a one-inch bevel on one side around the entire periphery. These bevels act as prisms in the sunlight creating an interesting color diffraction which both highlights the glasswork and provides a spectrum of colors which would ordinarily be absent in clear float glass. "Beveled glass" can be obtained as clusters which are arranged to create a specific design. These can vary from simple three or four piece designs, often used in top lights (commonly known as transoms) of windows and conservatories, to more complex combinations of many pieces, suitable for larger panels such as doors and side screens (known in the door industry as sidelites). Beveled glass has also been used with clear and colored textured glass to create designs. Textured glass is typically 1/8" thick and has a distinct visible texture. The combination of beveled glass is juxtaposed to the textured glass creating dramatic visual effects.1 Toughened or tempered glass is a type of safety glass processed by controlled thermal or chemical treatments to increase its strength compared with normal glass. Tempering creates balanced internal stresses which cause the glass, when broken, to crumble into small granular chunks instead of splintering into jagged shards. The granular chunks are less likely to cause injury. As a result of its safety and strength, tempered glass is used in a variety of demanding applications, including passenger vehicle windows, shower doors, architectural glass doors and tables, refrigerator trays, as a component of bulletproof glass, , and various types of plates and cookware. In the United States, since 1977 Federal law has required glass located within 18 in (46 cm) of a floor or doorway to be tempered.

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Glass Washers

A dishwasher is a mechanical device for cleaning dishes and eating utensils. Unlike manual dishwashing, which relies largely on physical scrubbing to remove soiling, the mechanical (electric) dishwasher cleans by spraying hot water, typically between 55 to 75 °C (130 to 170 °F) at the dishes, with lower temperatures used for delicate items. A mix of water and detergent is used for cleaning purposes, followed by clean water to remove the detergent residue. Some dishwashers have multiple wash and rinse periods within the complete cycle

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Furniture, Wood

Furnishings created of wood include bathroom furniture (accessories, sets, shelving, sinks, spacesavers, vanities, laundry hampers, racks and cabinets, step stools, towel racks, etc.), mirrors, closet storage, dining room furniture (bar stools, dinette sets, chairs, sets, pub tables, sideboards, etc.), kitchen furniture (bakers racks, buffets, carts, islands, stools, carts, etc.), living room furniture (chairs, chaises, entertainment centers, fireplaces, futons, bars, stools, occasional tables, rocking chairs, etc.), entry and foyer furniture (chests, coat racks, tables and consoles, hall trees, etc.), accent furniture (tables, benches and seating, curio cabinets, game tables, patio furniture, storage and organization.

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Furniture, Upholstered

Upholstered furniture comprises sectionals, sofas and loveseats, settees, dining chairs and club chairs, chaises, ottomans, benches, headboards and beds, and more.

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Furniture, Outdoor

Outdoor furniture may consist of patio sets, chairs, tables, sectionals and deep seating, chaise lounges, bar furniture and serving carts, tiki bars, benches, hammocks, swings and gliders, rocking chairs, umbrellas, storage, garden benches, etc.

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Furniture, Metal

Metal furniture - weathered or polished metal, brass, or (wrought) iron - includes beds, tables, kitchen bakers racks, curio cabinets, bar stools, outdoor furnishings;

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Furniture, Health Care

Furnishings for the healthcare environment may include seating: lounge, guest, patient, bariatric, therapeutic, recliner, physician/task, sleepover, children’s; beds; ottomans; tables; dressers; armoires; casegoods, files, and storage; desks; etc.

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Furniture Design

Architects’, interior designers’, and contractors’ concepts are realized with furniture creation.

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Furniture Accessories & Storage

Furniture accessories may include rugs, vases, glassware, cushions, blankets, fireplaces, lamps, wall décor, linens, lighting, decorative items, accent pillows, decorative chairs, and florals. Furniture storage includes jewelry armoires, cabinets, and racks - CD, magazine, coat, and hat

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Furniture - Fiberglass, Plastic, Resin

Furniture is movable objects intended to support various human activities such as seating and sleeping in beds, to hold objects at a convenient height for work using horizontal surfaces above the ground, or to store things. Storage furniture such as a nightstand often makes use of doors, drawers, shelves and locks to contain, organize or secure smaller objects such as clothes, tools, books, and household goods. Domestic furniture works to create, in conjunction with furnishings such as clocks and lighting, comfortable and convenient interior spaces. Furniture can be made from many materials.1 Fiberglass, (also called fibreglass and glass fibre), is a material consisting of numerous extremely fine fibers of glass. Fiberglass is used as a reinforcing agent for many polymer products; to form a very strong and light fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) composite material called glass-reinforced plastic (GRP), popularly known as "fiberglass".2 A plastic material is any of a wide range of synthetic or semi-synthetic organic solids used in the manufacture of industrial products. Plastics are typically polymers of high molecular mass, and may contain other substances to improve performance and/or reduce production costs. Monomers of plastic are either natural or synthetic organic compounds. Plastics are cast, pressed, or extruded into a variety of shapes. There are two types of plastics: thermoplastics and thermosetting polymers. Thermoplastics are the plastics that do not undergo chemical change in their composition when heated and can be moulded again and again; examples are polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). Thermosets can melt and take shape once; after they have solidified, they stay solid. The raw materials needed to make most plastics come from petroleum and natural gas.3 The word "resin" has been applied in the modern world to nearly any component of a liquid that will set into a hard lacquer or enamel-like finish.

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Fryers, Oil-Less

Oil-less fryers utilize infrared technology to thoroughly cook turkey, chicken, beef roast, pork tenderloin, and other large cuts of meat without the use of oil.

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