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Non Food Products

Cooking Equipment, Outdoors

Outdoor cooking differs substantially from kitchen-based cooking, the most obvious difference being lack of an easily defined kitchen area.1 Most outdoor cooking is dictated by the foods themselves which are to be cooked. …Direct heat, boiling, frying, grilling, and roasting…describe the cooking methods employed most often in outdoor cooking. These techniques will require only rudimentary, commonsensical tools. Additional methods… may be of interest only to those "foodies" who carry their interests into the outdoors for gourmet meals. These advanced methods may require additional equipment or techniques.2 Dutch ovens were traditionally specially designed for camping, and such pots (often with legs and a handle, both for suspending the pot over a fire) are still widely available, though sometimes at a premium over flat-bottomed stovetop models. The oven is placed in a bed of hot coals, often from a keyhole fire with additional coals placed on top of the lid... Dutch ovens are made of cast iron or aluminum... Dutch ovens are convenient for cooking dishes that take a long time such as stews, joints of meat and baked goods. Portable stoves are widely used in areas where fuel such as wood is scarce... Such devices usually use a liquid fuel (usually a petroleum derivative or some kind of alcohol), but gaseous fuels like propane and solid fuels such as wood shavings and hexamine are also used depending on the stove design… Reflector ovens are placed on the ground next to [a] fire, and gather thermal radiation from it. Solar cookers are sometimes used in places where absolutely minimal environmental impact is required or simply desired. Ceramic Grills come in many guises and have been around in simple format since ancient times. Many modern cookers sport ornate designs that can be quite beautiful. These grills cook well and efficiently because they retain heat and seal in moisture. Most quality grills are weatherproof and can be used year-round to grill, BBQ, smoke, and bake. Other benefits include fast heating time and a lack of hot-spots. They are fuel-efficient, using a minimum of charcoal, and may be safer for children due to the lack of hot-spots.3
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Cooking Equipment, Induction

An induction cooker uses induction heating for cooking. Unlike other forms of cooking, heat is generated directly in the pot or pan (cooking vessel), as opposed to being generated in the stovetop by electrical coils or burning gas. To be used on an induction cooker, a cooking vessel must be made of a ferromagnetic metal. In an induction hob (cooktop), a coil of copper wire is placed underneath the cooking pot. An alternating electric current flows through the coil, which produces an oscillating magnetic field. This field induces an electric current in the pot, which produces resistive heating proportional to the square of the current and to the electrical resistance of the vessel. Some additional heat is created by hysteresis losses in the pot due to its ferromagnetic nature, but this creates less than ten percent of the total heat generated. Induction cookers are faster and more energy-efficient than traditional electric hobs. They allow instant control of cooking energy similar to gas burners. Because induction heats the cooking vessel itself, the possibility of burn injury is significantly less than with other methods; the surface of the cook top is only heated from contact with the vessel. There are no flames or red-hot electric heating elements as found in traditional cooking equipment. The induction effect does not heat the air around the vessel, resulting in further energy efficiencies; some air is blown through the cooktop to cool the electronics, but this air emerges only a little warmer than ambient temperature. Since heat is being generated by an induced electric current, the unit can detect whether cookware is present (or whether its contents have boiled dry) by monitoring how much power is being absorbed. That allows such functions as keeping a pot at minimal boil or automatically turning an element off when cookware is removed from it.1
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Cooking Equipment, Electric & Gas

There are many different types of equipment used for cooking. Ovens are mostly hollow devices that get very hot (up to 500 °F) and are used for baking or roasting, and offer a dry-heat cooking method. Different cuisines will use different types of ovens: i.e., Indian culture uses a Tandoor oven, which is a cylindrical clay oven which operates at a single high temperature; western kitchens will use variable temperature convection ovens, conventional ovens, toaster ovens in addition to non-radiant heat ovens like the microwave oven; classic Italian cuisine will include use of a brick oven containing burning wood. Thus, ovens may be wood-fired, coal-fired, gas, electric, or oil-fired. Various types of cook-tops are used as well. They carry the same variations of fuel types as the ovens mentioned above. Cook-tops are used to heat vessels placed on top of the heat source, such as a sauté pan, sauce pot, frying pan, or a pressure cooker. These pieces of equipment can use either a moist or dry cooking method, and include methods such as steaming, simmering, boiling, and poaching for moist methods; while the dry methods include sautéing, pan frying, or deep-frying. In addition, many cultures use grills for cooking. A grill operates with a radiant heat source from below, usually covered with a metal grid and sometimes a cover.1
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Conveyors, Belt

conveyor belt (or belt conveyor) consists of two or more pulleys, with a continuous loop of material - the conveyor belt - that rotates about them. One or both of the pulleys are powered, moving the belt and the material on the belt forward. The powered pulley is called the drive pulley while the unpowered pulley is called the idler. There are two main industrial classes of belt conveyors; those in general material handling such as those moving boxes along inside a factory and bulk material handling such as those used to transport industrial and agricultural materials, such as grain, coal, ores, etc. generally in outdoor locations. Generally, companies providing general material handling type belt conveyors do not provide the conveyors for bulk material handling. In addition, there are a number of commercial applications of belt conveyors such as those in grocery stores.

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Dryers, Dish/Tray

With hot-air circulation, the dish dryer speeds the drying process and maintains sanitation of dinner wares. Industrial tray dryers force warm, dry air through blowers in a sealed area to dry many flat trays at one time. Batch, semi-continuous, and cross flow are the three types of tray dryers.
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Dryers, Clothes

A clothes dryer or tumble dryer is an appliance that is used to remove moisture from a load of clothing and other textiles, generally shortly after they are cleaned in a washing machine. Most dryers consist of a rotating drum called a tumbler through which heated air is circulated to evaporate the moisture from the load. The tumbler is rotated to maintain space between the articles in the load.
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Drapery & Curtain Hardware

Curtain [drapery] hardware includes products like hooks, curtain rings, curtain finials, etc. These products are used to hang curtain at doors, windows, verandas, etc. Curtain [drapery] hooks and poles are used to handle and move the curtains [draperies]. Curtain [drapery] hardware products are made of varieties of materials including metals and plastics. Mostly aluminum and iron are used for making rings, hooks, rods, and poles.
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Draperies, Stage

Theater drapes and stage curtains are large pieces of cloth that are designed to mask backstage areas from spectators. They come in various types, each designed for a different purpose, though most are made from black or other dark colored, light-absorbing material such as heavyweight velour. Proscenium stages use a greater variety of drapes than arena or thrust stages. In proscenium theaters, drapes are typically suspended from battens (i.e., they are "flown", in theater terminology) that are controlled by a fly system. When a drape is flown, the task of adjusting its height for best masking effect is simplified and, in the case of a drape that must be moved during a performance, this enables the drape to be quickly raised above the proscenium arch—thus positioning it out of view of spectators—or lowered to any arbitrary height above the stage, as required.1 Fabric flammability is an important textile issue, especially for stage drapery that will be used in a public space such as a school, theatre or special event venue. In the United States, Federal regulations require that drapery fabrics used in such spaces be certified as flame or fire retardant.
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Draperies, Curtains & Hangings

A curtain (sometimes known as a drape, mainly in the United States) is a piece of cloth intended to block or obscure light, or drafts, or water in the case of a shower curtain. Curtains hung over a doorway are known as portières. Curtains are often hung on the inside of a building's window to block the travel of light, for instance at night to aid sleeping, or to stop light from escaping outside the building (stopping people outside from being able to see inside, often for privacy reasons). In this application, they are also known as "draperies." Curtains come in a variety of shapes, materials, sizes, colors, and patterns. Curtains vary according to cleanability, ultraviolet light deterioration, oil and dust retention, noise absorption, fire resistance, and life span. Curtain may be moved by hand, with cords, by press-button pads, or remote-controlled computers. An adaptation of the curtain may be a blind or, in warmer countries, wooden shutters that are fixed to the outside of the building to provide privacy and still keep the building cool inside.
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Doughnut Machines

A doughnut or donut is a type of fried-dough food popular in many countries and prepared in various forms as a sweet (or occasionally savory) snack that can be homemade or purchased in bakeries, supermarkets, food stalls, and franchised specialty outlets. They are usually sweet, deep-fried from a flour dough, and shaped in rings or flattened spheres that sometimes contain fillings. Other types of dough such as potato can also be used as well as other batters, and various toppings and flavorings are used for different types.1 Automatic or automated, a doughnut machine has a non-stick baking surface outfitted to create doughnut rings.
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Dough Dividers/Rounders

Dough is a paste made out of any cereals (grains) or leguminous crops by mixing flour with a small amount of water and/or other liquid. This process is a precursor to making a wide variety of foodstuffs, particularly breads and bread-based items (e.g., dumplings), including flatbreads, and pancakes, noodles, crusts, pastry, and similar items. This includes all kinds of breads or similar recipes made from wheat, maize, rice, sorghum, and other cereals or related crops used around the world.1 Dough dividers and rounders may be hand-operated or automatic, offering quickness and efficiency, often used in bakery and pizza operations, with the ability to divide and roll large amounts of dough.
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Doors, Miscellaneous

A door is a movable structure used to close off an entrance, typically consisting of a panel that swings on hinges or that slides or rotates inside of a space. When open, they admit ventilation and light. The door is used to control the physical atmosphere within a space by enclosing it, excluding air drafts, so that interiors may be more effectively heated or cooled. Doors are significant in preventing the spread of fire. They also act as a barrier to noise. They are also used to screen areas of a building for aesthetics, keeping formal and utility areas separate. Doors also have an aesthetic role in creating an impression of what lies beyond. Doors are often symbolically endowed with ritual purposes, and the guarding or receiving of the keys to a door, or being granted access to a door can have special significance
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Doors, Cold Storage & Freezer

Refrigeration is a process in which work is done to move heat from one location to another. Refrigeration has many applications including industrial freezers.1 Added to your entrance frame, cold storage freezer doors tightly seal and insulate while providing convenient access and reducing energy cost.
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Dispensers, Wine

Wine is an alcoholic beverage, made of fermented fruit juice, usually from grapes. The natural chemical balance of grapes lets them ferment without the addition of sugars, acids, enzymes, or other nutrients. Grape wine is produced by fermenting crushed grapes using various types of yeast. Yeast consumes the sugars in the grapes and converts them into alcohol. Different varieties of grapes and strains of yeasts produce different types of wine. Wines made from other fruits, such as apples and berries, are normally named after the fruit from which they are produced (for example, apple wine or elderberry wine) and are generically called fruit wine or country wine (not to be confused with the French term vin de pays). Others, such as barley wine and rice wine (i.e., sake), are made from starch-based materials and resemble beer and spirit more than wine, while ginger wine is fortified with brandy. In these cases, the term "wine" refers to the higher alcohol content rather than production process. The commercial use of the English word "wine" (and its equivalent in other languages) is protected by law in many jurisdictions.1 With a wine dispenser, wine by the glass may be served, with the amount left in the bottle quality preserved
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Dispensers, Soup

Soup is a food that is made by combining ingredients such as meat and vegetables with stock, juice, water, or another liquid. Hot soups are additionally characterized by boiling solid ingredients in liquids in a pot until the flavors are extracted, forming a broth. Traditionally, soups are classified into two main groups: clear soups and thick soups. The established French classifications of clear soups are bouillon and consommé. Thick soups are classified depending upon the type of thickening agent used: purées are vegetable soups thickened with starch; bisques are made from puréed shellfish or vegetables thickened with cream; cream soups may be thickened with béchamel sauce; and veloutés are thickened with eggs, butter, and cream. Other ingredients commonly used to thicken soups and broths include rice, flour, and grains. Soups are similar to stews, and in some cases there may not be a clear distinction between the two. Generally though, soups have more liquid than stews.1 Condensing soup allows soup to be packaged into a smaller can and sold at a lower price than other canned soups. The soup is usually doubled in volume by adding a "can full" of water or milk (about 10 ounces).2 Asian-style soup mixes containing ramen noodles are marketed by Western and Asian manufacturers as an inexpensive instant meal, requiring only hot water for preparation. In terms of Western-style cuisine, vegetable, chicken base, potato, pasta, and cheese soups are also available in dry mix form, ready to be served by adding hot water and sometimes fresh ingredients such as meat or vegetables.3 A tureen is a serving dish for foods such as soups or stews, often shaped as a broad, deep, oval vessel with fixed handles and a low domed cover with a knob or handle. Over the centuries, tureens have appeared in many different forms, some round, rectangular, or made into fanciful shapes such as animals or wildfowl. Tureens may be ceramic—either the glazed earthenware called faience or porcelain—or silver, and customarily they stand on an undertray or platter made en suite.4 Kettle-insert soup serving systems are available in many varieties, to soup hot for hours.
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Dispensers, Snack

A snack is a small portion of food, as contrasted with a regular meal. Traditionally snacks were prepared from ingredients commonly available in the home, often leftovers, sandwiches made from cold cuts, nuts, fruit, and the like. With the spread of convenience stores, packaged snack foods are now a significant business. Snack foods are typically designed to be portable, quick and satisfying. Processed snack foods are designed to be less perishable, more durable, and more appealing than prepared foods. They often contain substantial amounts of sweeteners, preservatives, and appealing ingredients such as chocolate, peanuts, and specially-designed flavors (such as flavored potato chips).1 A vending machine is a machine that provides snacks, etc.2 Device for dispensing goods: a device that releases its contents in convenient or
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Dispensers, Self Leveling For Dishes, Trays

Dispenser: Provider of something: somebody or something that distributes something.1 Leveling: a device used for determining or adjusting something to a horizontal surface.2 A self-leveling dispenser of dishes or trays will adjust its height up after an item has been removed.
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Dispensers, Non-Carbonated Beverages

Non-Carbonated beverages are those without ‘the dissolving of carbon dioxide in an aqueous solution…bubbles.’1 Electric and non-electric, auto- and manual-fill dispensers dispense a variety of beverages. Iced beverage and keg coolers as well as insulated bins and containers are also useful. Beverage-dispensing backpacks allow portability for canned or bottled refreshments.
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Dispensers, Liquor

A distilled beverage, liquor, or spirit is a drinkable liquid containing ethanol that is produced by distilling, i.e. concentrating by distillation, the alcohol and other compounds produced by fermented grain, fruit, or vegetables. This excludes undistilled fermented beverages such as beer, wine, and hard cider.1 A tap is a valve (also called faucet and spigot in the U.S.) controlling release of liquids or gas. In the U.S., the term "tap" is more often used for beer taps...
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Dispensers, Ice Cream

Ice cream is a frozen dessert usually made from dairy products, such as milk and cream, and often combined with fruits or other ingredients and flavors. Most varieties contain sugar, although some are made with other sweeteners. In some cases, artificial flavorings and colorings are used in addition to (or in replacement of) the natural ingredients. This mixture is stirred slowly while cooling to prevent large ice crystals from forming; the result is a smoothly textured ice cream. The meaning of the term ice cream varies from one country to another. Terms like frozen custard, frozen yogurt, sorbet, gelato, and others are used to distinguish different varieties and styles. In some countries, like the USA, the term ice cream applies only to a specific variety, and their governments regulate the commercial use of all these terms based on quantities of ingredients. In others, like Italy and Argentina, one word is used for all the variants. Alternatives made from soy milk, rice milk, and goat milk are available for those who are lactose intolerant or have an allergy to dairy protein, or in the case of soy and rice milk, for those who want to avoid animal products.1 Ice cream can be mass-produced and thus is widely available in developed parts of the world. Ice cream can be purchased in large cartons (vats and squrounds) from supermarkets and grocery stores, in smaller quantities from ice cream shops, convenience stores, and milk bars, and in individual servings from small carts or vans at public events. Some ice cream distributors sell ice cream products from traveling refrigerated vans or carts (commonly referred to in the US as "ice cream trucks"), sometimes equipped with speakers playing children's music
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Fabrication, Wood

Fabricate: 1. To make; create. 2. To construct by combining or assembling diverse, typically standardized parts.1 Wood is a hard, fibrous tissue found in many plants. It has been used for centuries for both fuel and as a construction material for several types of living areas such as houses, known as carpentry. It is an organic material, a natural composite of cellulose fibers (which are strong in tension) embedded in a matrix of lignin which resists compression. Wood may also refer to other plant materials with comparable properties, and to material engineered from wood, or wood chips or fiber. People have used wood for millennia for many purposes, primarily as a fuel or as a construction material for making houses, tools, weapons, furniture, packaging, artworks, and paper. Wood can be dated by carbon dating and in some species by dendrochronology to make inferences about when a wooden object was created.
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Fabrication, Stainless Steel

Fabrication as an industrial term refers to building metal structures by cutting, bending, and assembling. The cutting part of fabrication is via sawing, shearing, or chiseling (all with manual and powered variants) and v via hammering (manual or powered) or via press brakes and similar tools. The assembling (joining of the pieces) is via welding, binding with adhesives, riveting, threaded fasteners, or even yet more bending in the form of a crimped seam. Structural steel and sheet metal are the usual starting materials for fabrication, along with the welding wire, flux, and fasteners that will join the cut pieces. As with other manufacturing processes, both human labor and automation are commonly used. The product resulting from (the process of) fabrication may be called a fabrication. Shops that specialize in this type of metal work are called fab shops. The end products of other common types of metalworking, such as machining, metal stamping, forging, and casting, may be similar in shape and function, but those processes are not classified as fabrication.
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Fabrication, Metalwork

Fabrication as an industrial term refers to building metal structures by cutting, bending, and assembling. The cutting part of fabrication is via sawing, shearing, or chiseling (all with manual and powered variants) and via CNC cutters (using a laser, plasma torch, or water jet). The bending is via hammering (manual or powered) or via press brakes and similar tools. The assembling (joining of the pieces) is via welding, binding with adhesives, riveting, threaded fasteners, or even yet more bending in the form of a crimped seam. Structural steel and sheet metal are the usual starting materials for fabrication, along with the welding wire, flux, and fasteners that will join the cut pieces. As with other manufacturing processes, both human labor and automation are commonly used. The product resulting from (the process of) fabrication may be called a fabrication. Shops that specialize in this type of metal work are called fab shops. The end products of other common types of metalworking, such as machining, metal stamping, forging, and casting, may be similar in shape and function, but those processes are not classified as fabrication. Metal fabrication is a value-added process that involves the construction of machines and structures from various raw materials. A fab shop will bid on a job, usually based on the engineering drawings, and if awarded the contract will build the product. Fabrication shops are employed by contractors, OEM's and VAR's. Typical projects include; loose parts, structural frames for buildings and heavy equipment, and hand railings and stairs for buildings.
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Exhaust Fans

An exhaust system is usually tubing used to guide reaction exhaust gases away from a controlled combustion inside an engine or stove. The entire system conveys burnt gases from the engine, and includes one or more exhaust pipes. A fan is a machine used to create flow within a fluid, typically a gas such as air. A fan consists of a rotating arrangement of vanes or blades which act on the air. Usually, it is contained within some form of housing or case. This may direct the airflow or increase safety by preventing objects from contacting the fan blades. Most fans are powered by electric motors, but other sources of power may be used, including hydraulic motors and internal combustion engines. Typical applications include climate control, vehicle and machinery cooling systems, personal comfort (e.g., an electric table fan), ventilation, fume extraction, winnowing (e.g., separating chaff of cereal grains), removing dust (e.g. in a vacuum cleaner), drying (usually in combination with heat) and to provide draft for a fire.
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Espresso Coffee Equipment

Caffè espresso or simply espresso (or somewhat controversially, expressoa), is a concentrated beverage brewed by forcing hot water under pressure through finely ground coffee. Compared to other coffee brewing methods, espresso often has a thicker consistency, a higher concentration of suspended solids, and crema (foam). As a result of the pressurized brewing process, all of the flavours and chemicals in a typical cup of coffee are very concentrated. For this reason, espresso is the base for other drinks, such as lattes, cappuccino, macchiato, mochas, and americanos.1 Espresso is made by forcing hot water under high pressure through a tightly compacted finely ground coffee. Generally, one uses an espresso machine to make espresso, although there are stove-top espresso makers and hand-operated devices. The act of producing a shot of espresso is often termed "pulling" a shot, originating from lever espresso machines which require pulling down a handle attached to a spring-loaded piston, forcing hot water through the coffee at high pressure. Today, however, it is more common for the pressure to be generated by steam or a pump. This process produces an almost syrupy beverage by extracting and emulsifying the oils in the ground coffee.2 A professional operator of an espresso machine is a barista, the Italian word for a bartender.
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Equipment, Upholstery Cleaning & Shampooing

Upholstery is the work of providing furniture, especially seats, with padding, springs, webbing, and fabric or leather covers. The term is applied to domestic furniture and also to automobiles, airplanes and boats. Traditional upholstery uses old methods and materials, coil springs (post-1850), animal hair (horse, hog & cow), coir, straw and hay, hessians, linen scrims, wadding, etc., and is done by hand, building each layer up.1 [Commercial upholstery for] businesses [includes] restaurant seating consisting of booth seats, dining room chairs, bar stools, etc. Also churches, including but not limited to pews and chairs for the congregation, hospitals, and clinics consisting of medical tables, chiropractic tables, dental chairs, etc. Also common to this type of upholstery would be lobby and waiting-area seating. Upholstered walls are found in some retail premises.2 Dust settles on upholstered furniture just as on hard surfaces, and should be removed regularly, about once a month, depending on environment and use, with vacuum cleaner attachments - the upholstery nozzle and crevice tool. A brush will remove some dust if you do not have a vacuum, but will also scatter dust around. However, down-filled cushions that are not lined with down-proof ticking should be brushed, as vacuum may draw out down. Reduce greasy soil in air by use of range hood when cooking; clean furnace filters reduce soil in air. Arm and headrest covers of matching or harmonizing fabric protect those areas against early build-up of soil from skin and hair. In summer, if people will be sitting on furniture in shorts, cover with washable throws, sheets, or large pieces of terrycloth to protect from body soil.
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Equipment, Underbar

Underbar equipment may include accessory shelves, cold plates, coolers, condiment dispensers, double-speed rails, drain boards, dry-waste chutes, ice bins, liquor displays, side splash, towel rings, wet-waste sinks with faucets, etc
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Equipment, Rug Cleaning

Carpet cleaning, for beautification, and the removal of stains, dirt, grit, sand, and allergens can be achieved by several methods, both traditional and modern. Clean carpets are recognized by manufacturers as being more visually pleasing, potentially longer-lasting, and probably healthier than poorly maintained carpets. 'Sanitary Maintenance' magazine reports that carpet cleaning is widely misunderstood, and chemical developers have only within recent decades created new carpet-care technologies. Particularly, encapsulation and other green technologies work better, are easier to use, require less training, save more time and money, and lead to less resoiling than prior methods. The professional carpet-cleaning industry is primarily educated and unofficially governed by the Institute of Inspection, Cleaning, and Restoration Certification (IICRC). It is a nonprofit certifying body for the specialized fabric-cleaning industry that sets modern carpet-cleaning standards. It accepts five basic dry and wet professional cleaning methodologies.
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Equipment, Leasing

Leasing is a process by which a firm can obtain the use of a certain fixed assets for which it must pay a series of contractual, periodic, tax deductible payments. The lessee is the receiver of the services or the assets under the lease contract, and the lessor is the owner of the assets.1 There are two principal types of leasing, depending upon the party taking the risk of the value of the vehicle (or other leased property) at lease end. In the U.S., this is called closed-end leasing. In other jurisdictions, it is called hire purchase, lease purchase, or finance leasing. Businesses often choose to lease rather than buy office equipment, including computers. Since office equipment depreciates rapidly, leasing can be more cost-efficient than ownership.
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Equipment, Hot Chocolate Making

Hot chocolate (also known as hot cocoa or just cocoa) is a heated beverage typically consisting of shaved chocolate, melted chocolate or cocoa powder, heated milk or water, and sugar. Drinking chocolate is similar to hot chocolate, but is made from melted chocolate shavings or paste rather than a powdered mix that's soluble in water. Until the 19th century, hot chocolate was even used medicinally to treat ailments such as stomach diseases. Today, hot chocolate is consumed throughout the world and comes in multiple variations including the very thick cioccolata densa served in Italy, and the thinner hot cocoa that is typically consumed in the United States.1 In the United States, the drink is popular in instant form, made with hot water or milk from a packet containing mostly cocoa powder, sugar, and dry milk. This is the thinner of the two main variations. It is very sweet and may be topped with marshmallows, whipped cream, or a piece of solid chocolate.2 Hot chocolate machines heat and continually mix chocolate, in a baine-marie method for smoothness and thickness without burning.
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Equipment, Heating-Boilers, Furnaces, Radiators

A heater is an object that emits heat or causes another body to achieve a higher temperature. In a household or domestic setting, heaters are usually appliances whose purpose is to generate heating (i.e. warmth). Heaters exists for all states of matter, including solids, liquids, and gases.1 A boiler is a closed vessel in which water or other fluid is heated. The heated or vaporized fluid exits the boiler for use in various processes or heating applications.2 A furnace is a device used for heating. In American English and Canadian English, the term furnace on its own is generally used to describe household heating systems based on a central furnace (known either as a boiler or a heater in British English), and sometimes as a synonym for kiln, a device used in the production of ceramics. In British English, the term furnace is used exclusively to mean industrial furnaces which are used for many things, such as the extraction of metal from ore (smelting) or in oil refineries and other chemical plants, for example as the heat source for fractional distillation columns. The term furnace can also refer to a direct-fired heater, used in boiler applications in chemical industries or for providing heat to chemical reactions for processes like cracking, and is part of the standard English names for many metallurgical furnaces worldwide. The heat energy to fuel a furnace may be supplied directly by fuel combustion, by electricity such as the electric arc furnace, or through Induction heating in induction furnaces.3 Radiators are heat exchangers used to transfer thermal energy from one medium to another for the purpose of cooling and heating. The majority of radiators are constructed to function in automobiles, buildings, and electronics. The radiator is always a source of heat to its environment, although this may be for either the purpose of heating this environment, or for cooling the fluid or coolant supplied to it, as for engine cooling.
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Equipment, Front Office

Office supplies is the generic term that refers to all supplies regularly used in offices by businesses and other organizations, from private citizens to governments, who work with the collection, refinement, and output of information (colloquially referred to as "paper work"). The term includes small, expendable, daily use items such as paper clips, post-it notes, staples, hole punches, binders and laminators, writing utensils and paper, but also encompasses higher-cost equipment like computers, printers, fax machines, photocopiers, and cash registers, as well as office furniture such as cubicles, filing cabinets, and armoire desks
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Equipment, Food Forming

A mold or mould is a container used in various techniques of food preparation to shape the finished dish.1 A forming machine is a piece of food processing equipment that forms soft foods into shapes.
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Equipment, Exercise

Exercise equipment is any equipment used for physical exercise to produce and promote fitness health for specific areas of the body. The terms "exercise equipment" and "fitness equipment" have become interchangeable, but only exercise can produce fitness. This suggests that the term "exercise equipment" is preferable when referring to this type of equipment.
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Equipment, Drain Cleaning

A drain cleaner is a consumer product or device that unblocks sewer pipes or helps to prevent the occurrence of clogged drains. Drain cleaners can be classified in three categories, according to their intended use. If a single sink, toilet, or tub or shower drain is clogged, the first choice is normally a drain cleaner that can remove soft obstructions such as hair and grease clogs that can accumulate close to interior drain openings. ,Chemical drain cleaners, plungers, handheld drain augers, air burst drain cleaners, and home remedy drain cleaners are intended for this purpose. If more than one plumbing fixture is clogged, the first choice is normally a drain cleaner that can remove soft or hard obstructions along the entire length of the drain, from the drain opening through the main sewer drain to the lateral piping outside the building., Electric drain cleaners and sewer jetters are intended for this purpose. When performing preventative drain cleaning to reduce the future occurrence of clogs, enzymatic drain cleaners and sewer jetters are normally used.
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Equipment, Dish Handling

Dishware is the general term for the dishes used in serving and eating food, including plates and bowls. Dinnerware is a synonym, especially meaning a set of dishes, including serving pieces.1 Dishwashing is usually done using an implement for the washer to wield, unless done using an automated dishwasher. Commonly used implements include cloths, sponges, brushes, or even steel wool when tackling particularly intransigent stuck-on food particles. Dishwashing detergent (aka "washing up liquid") is also generally used, but in principle all that is required is water. Rubber gloves are sometimes worn when washing dishes by people who are sensitive to hot water or dishwashing liquids, or who simply don't want to touch the old food particles.2 Mobile single- or double-sided transport carts accommodate various sizes of bowls, dishes, plates, and plate covers.
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Equipment, Cook-Chill

There are many different types of equipment used for cooking. Ovens are mostly hollow devices that get very hot (up to 500 °F) and are used for baking or roasting, and offer a dry-heat cooking method. Different cuisines will use different types of ovens: i.e., Indian culture uses a Tandoor oven, which is a cylindrical clay oven which operates at a single high temperature; western kitchens will use variable temperature convection ovens, conventional ovens, toaster ovens in addition to non-radiant heat ovens like the microwave oven; classic Italian cuisine will include use of a brick oven containing burning wood. Thus, ovens may be wood-fired, coal-fired, gas, electric, or oil-fired. Various types of cook-tops are used as well. They carry the same variations of fuel types as the ovens mentioned above. Cook-tops are used to heat vessels placed on top of the heat source, such as a sauté pan, sauce pot, frying pan, or a pressure cooker. These pieces of equipment can use either a moist or dry cooking method, and include methods such as steaming, simmering, boiling, and poaching for moist methods; while the dry methods include sautéing, pan frying, or deep-frying. In addition, many cultures use grills for cooking. A grill operates with a radiant heat source from below, usually covered with a metal grid and sometimes a cover.1 A cooler, cool box, portable ice chest, chilly bin (in New Zealand), or esky (Australia) most commonly is an insulated box used to keep food or drink cool. Ice cubes are most commonly placed in it to help the things inside stay cool. Ice packs are sometimes used, as they either contain the melting water inside, or have a gel sealed inside that stays cold longer than plain ice (absorbing heat as it changes phase). Coolers are usually made with interior and exterior shells of plastic, with a hard foam in between. They come in sizes from small personal ones to large family ones with wheels. Disposable ones are made solely from styrene foam (such as is a disposable coffee cup) about 2 cm or one inch thick. Most reusable ones have molded-in handles; a few have shoulder straps.
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Energy Conservation Equipment

Air curtains and doors as well as cooling, heating, and ventilating systems conserve energy for clean-room, customer and personnel service entrances, drive-up windows, guard shacks, fire stations, in-plant offices, police stations, receiving and loading docks, walk-ins, etc. Air make-up, direct-fired, evaporative-cooling, electric, gas, heating, hydraulic, and ventilation are air systems. Energy conservation equipment may well-serve commercial kitchens, convalescent homes, drug stores, dry cleaning, factories, garages, hospitals, hotels, laundries, manufacturing facilities, office buildings, restaurants, shopping plazas, supermarkets, transportation terminals, and warehouses.
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Enclosures, Patio & Pool

A patio (from the Spanish: patio meaning 'back garden' or 'backyard') is an outdoor space generally used for dining or recreation that adjoins a residence and is typically paved. It may refer to a roofless inner courtyard of the sort found in Spanish-style dwellings or a paved area between a residence and a garden. Patios are typically made of concrete or stone slabs laid over a base. This base is often a layer of compacted stone chips, a layer of sharp sand, and a layer of cement mortar.
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Electronic Controls

Single- and three-phase (DC and AC) electronic controls manage appliances, commercial, food service, and industrial. Controls regulate flow, interconnectivity, liquid level, power, pressure, produce functions, temperature, time, etc. to provide efficiency, power quality, safety, etc.
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